Nice to see the FDA get the definition set, now to see about cross contamination…

Nice to see the FDA get the definition set, now to see about cross contamination  and shared facilities

F.D.A. Sets a Standard on Labeling ‘Gluten Free’
Health officials said the step would help the three million Americans with celiac disease and bring uniformity to the $4 billion market for gluten-free foods.

Are advisory statements, such as “made in a factory that also processes wheat products” permitted on labels of foods bearing a gluten-free claim?

Yes. The final rule does not prohibit the inclusion of an advisory label statement, such as “made in a facility that also processes wheat,” on foods labeled gluten-free, provided that the statement is truthful and not misleading. FDA would need to evaluate food labels on a case-by-case basis to determine whether a specific advisory statement included along with a gluten-free claim would be potentially misleading to the consumer. However, any food whose label bears a gluten-free claim, regardless of whether it also has an advisory statement, must meet all the requirements of the final rule.

 

Questions and Answers: Gluten-Free Food Labeling Final Rule
Questions on FDA’s Final Rule on Gluten-Free Food Labeling

FDA answers questions about new #glutenfree   labeling requirements. http://www.fda.gov/Food/GuidanceRegulation/GuidanceDocumentsRegulatoryInformation/Allergens/ucm362880.htm

FDA defines “gluten-free” for food labeling
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today published a new regulation defining the term

Federal Register defines Gluten-Free

, , ,

3 Responses to Nice to see the FDA get the definition set, now to see about cross contamination…

  1. Kim Pebley August 5, 2013 at 4:08 am #

    I totally understand about codex standards and would also like to see it lowered. One step at a time :). Perhaps this will encourage people to eat less processed foods as well. At least the options for "convenience" foods are much better than just 5 years ago.

  2. Jean Layton August 4, 2013 at 10:09 am #

    The 20 ppm is established as the base worldwide by Codex Alimentarius.  I'd love to see it lower, but practicality needs to be inclusive for trade across borders.

  3. Kim Pebley August 4, 2013 at 2:08 am #

    There's so much more to think about too +Jean Layton.  Can't wait to see this unfold and be enforced.  What's your opinion about the 20ppm?  I knew that would be the starting point and it took years to get there….

Leave a Reply

Google+